New Mexico Backcountry Discovery Route

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If you grew up watching westerns on TV, the landscapes on the New Mexico BDR will bring back memories. It’s true Wild West with the history to prove it.

You’ll ride through areas where the notorious outlaw ‘Billy the Kid’ made history by eluding authorities and see the land the same way he did because not much has changed in many of these places. Wild horses, landscapes that roll on forever and the tiniest of towns highlight this route.

Beginning in Dell City, TX you’ll enjoy the Guadalupe Rim views on your way to the high-elevation historic town of Cloudcroft. Hot springs, and lakeside camping can be found on your way into the mountains of the Gila National Forest and you’ll even be a stone’s throw from AZ before heading back to the north east toward Colorado. Highlights include Chloride Canyon, long stretches between towns and endless dispersed camping options. The last section north of Abiquiu winds through high mountains with open meadows with groves of aspen trees and is as beautiful as it gets.

Best time of year: Late May/June and September/October. July and August are monsoon season with extremely high temperatures and not recommended.


The NMBDR is presented by Sandia BMW Motorcycles, with additional support from Santa Fe BMW Motorcycles.


Additional Route Information

In addition to the Interactive NMBDR Map on the right, SheADV.com hosts an interactive BDR Map that shows current weather conditions, estimated snow levels, and forest fires for all BDR’s.

See below for route updates, visit the BDR FacebookInstagram, or the NMBDR Thread on ADVrider.com, where you and other riders can post experiences, photos, and road condition reports.

The NMBDR film is available for streaming or download.

NMBDR LODGING

Frisco Lodging Company - Lodging (NMBDR)

42 Main Street
Reserve, NM 87830

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Hidden Springs Inn - Lodging (NMBDR)

2134 Hwy 180

Reserve, NM 87830

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Abiquiu - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Cuba - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Grants - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Reserve - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Elephant Butte - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Truth or Consequences - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

San Antonio - Food & Lodging (NMBDR)

side trip.

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Carrizozo - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Capitan - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

A small town famous for Smokey Bear. Smokey Bear was a bear found with burnt paws in the aftermath of the Capitan Gap Wildfire that became a symbol for forest fire prevention.

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Cloudcroft - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

The Lodge. Rebecca the Ghost.

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Alamogordo - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

side trip.

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Dell City TX - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Starting Gas stop. Some lodging through AirBnB.

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NMBDR FOOD

EL Farolito (El Rito, NM)

1212 Main St, El Rito NM 87530 (575) 581-9509

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Cafe Abiquiu (Abiquiu, NM)

21120 Hwy 84, Abiquiu NM 87510 (505) 685-4422

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Bode’s General Store (Abiquiu, NM)

21196 US Hwy 84, Abiquiu NM 87510 (505) 685-4422

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EL Bruno’s Restaurant & Cantina (Cuba, NM)

6453 Main 550 St, Cuba NM 87013 (575) 289-9429

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EL Cafecito (Grants, NM)

820 E Santa Fe Ave, Grants NM 87020 (505) 285-6229

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12th Street Coffee (Carrizozo, NM)

410 12th St, Carrizozo NM 88301 (575) 648-4299

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Ella’s Cafe (Reserve, NM)

96 Main St, Reserve NM 87830 (575) 533-6111

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Can’t Stop Smokin BBQ (Ruidosa, NM)

418 Mechem Dr, Ruidoso NM 88345 (575) 437-4227 Hours: Sun-Thurs: 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM Fri-Sat: 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM

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Adobe Does BBQ - Food (NMBDR)

95 B Main Street
Reserve, NM 87830

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Adobe Cafe & Bakery - Food (NMBDR)

2134 Hwy 180

Reserve, NM 87830

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El Rito - Food (NMBDR)

Abiquiu - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Cuba - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Grants - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Pie Town - Food (NMBDR)

side trip.

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Reserve - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Elephant Butte - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Truth or Consequences - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

San Antonio - Food & Lodging (NMBDR)

side trip.

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Carrizozo - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Capitan - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

A small town famous for Smokey Bear. Smokey Bear was a bear found with burnt paws in the aftermath of the Capitan Gap Wildfire that became a symbol for forest fire prevention.

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Cloudcroft - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

The Lodge. Rebecca the Ghost.

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High Rolls - Food & Gas (NMBDR)

Home of the famous Apple Barn.

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Alamogordo - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

side trip.

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Weed - Food & Gas (NMBDR)

First place on the route to get gas, after Dell City. Weed just has a small convenience store.

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Queen - Food & Gas (NMBDR)

Gas and store open sometimes.

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Dell City TX - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Starting Gas stop. Some lodging through AirBnB.

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NMBDR FUEL

Abiquiu - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Cuba - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Grants - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Reserve - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Winston - Gas (NMBDR)

Last gas available until Reserve, about 130 miles of very remote country.

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Elephant Butte - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Truth or Consequences - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Carrizozo - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Capitan - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

A small town famous for Smokey Bear. Smokey Bear was a bear found with burnt paws in the aftermath of the Capitan Gap Wildfire that became a symbol for forest fire prevention.

Visit Website »

Cloudcroft - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

The Lodge. Rebecca the Ghost.

Visit Website »

High Rolls - Food & Gas (NMBDR)

Home of the famous Apple Barn.

Visit Website »

Alamogordo - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

side trip.

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Weed - Food & Gas (NMBDR)

First place on the route to get gas, after Dell City. Weed just has a small convenience store.

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Dell City TX - Food, Gas, Lodging (NMBDR)

Starting Gas stop. Some lodging through AirBnB.

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NMBDR DISCOVERY POINTS

While riding the NMBDR, we recommend visiting some (or all) of these places, selected for their natural beauty, photo opportunities, historical significance, or pure pleasure of discovery! (These waypoints are included in the NMBDR GPS tracks available for a free download on this page). Send us your photos from these discovery points to share with the BDR community.

(Listing South to North)

Dell City TX Food, Gas, Lodging: 31.938805 -105.201222, on the route.

Starting Gas stop. Some lodging through AirBnB.

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Guadalupe Mountains National Park: 31.894318 -104.82175, side trip.

side trip.

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Dog Canyon Campground: 31.994474 -104.833408, side trip.

Dog Canyon Campground, a part of Guadalupe Mountains National Park is 20 miles southwest at the end of NM Highway 137. A good place to officially start the ride.

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Carlsbad Caverns: 32.129324 -104.646345, side trip.

side trip.

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Queen-Food & Gas: 32.193421 -104.739851, side trip.

Store open sometimes. Gas station no longer open.

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Sitting Bull Falls: 32.24553 -104.697038, side trip.

A long side trip to a waterfall and a day-use facility with water, restrooms, and pavillions. Sitting Bull Falls Recreation Area is open from 8:30 am to 5 pm daily and costs $5 fee to enter.

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Guadalupe Rim: 32.476239 -105.122746, on the route.

The Guadalupe Rim runs north-south and has excellent views west from the edge. The NMBDR gets close to the edge in the south and again in the north. Stop when you can to take in the views.

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Weed - Food & Gas: 32.802593 -105.517049, on the route.

First place on the route to get gas, after Dell City. Weed just has a small convenience store.

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Apache Point Stellar Observatory: 32.780205 -105.819745, side trip.

Another great viewpoint, overlooking White Sands.

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Sunspot: 32.790574 -105.815486, side trip.

side trip.

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Sacramento Peak Solar Observatory: 32.787259 -105.819958, side trip.

side trip.

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West Side Road: 32.844954 -105.831814, on the route.

Dirt route along the western facing Sacramento Mountains, great views of Alamogordo and White Sands.

Alamogordo - Food, Gas, Lodging: 32.899751 -105.960326, side trip.

side trip.

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White Sands National Monument: 32.779349 -106.172126, side trip.

side trip.

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High Rolls - Food & Gas: 32.951013 -105.835973, on the route.

Home of the famous Apple Barn.

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Cloudcroft - Food, Gas, Lodging: 32.957531 -105.742796, side trip.

The Lodge. Rebecca the Ghost.

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Ruidoso Downs: 33.332804 -105.608522, side trip.

side trip.

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Ski Apache: 33.397275 -105.788207, side trip.

One of the most scenic roads in New Mexico. Spectacular to ride.

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Bonito Lake: 33.456014 -105.730765, side trip.

side trip.

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Fort Stanton: 33.493913 -105.525766, side trip.

side trip.

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Monjeau Lookout: 33.43087 -105.731546, side trip.

Near Ruidoso. Side trip, worth it if a person has time.

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Capitan - Food, Gas, Lodging: 33.545563 -105.572947, side trip.

A small town famous for Smokey Bear. Smokey Bear was a bear found with burnt paws in the aftermath of the Capitan Gap Wildfire that became a symbol for forest fire prevention.

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Carrizozo - Food, Gas, Lodging: 33.641786 -105.877786, on the route.

San Antonio - Food & Lodging: 33.917861 -106.867485, side trip.

side trip.

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Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge: 33.804842 -106.890952, side trip.

side trip.

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Truth or Consequences - Food, Gas, Lodging: 33.130042 -107.253207, on the route.

Elephant Butte - Food, Gas, Lodging: 33.188709 -107.222706, on the route.

Geronimo Trail National Scenic Byway: 33.383429 -107.606567, on the route.

Winston - Gas: 33.346576 -107.648202, on the route.

Last gas available until Reserve, about 130 miles of very remote country.

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Chloride Ghost Town: 33.338541 -107.677765, on the route.

Chloride Canyon: 33.337611 -107.693812, on the route.

Chloride Canyon has a fun twisty road that passes by many different mines and petroglyph sites.

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Beaverhead Workstation: 33.423887 -108.111485, on the route.

San Francisco Plaza: 33.693578 -108.766413, on the route.

Reserve - Food, Gas, Lodging: 33.713276 -108.757861, on the route.

Bill Knight Gap: 33.936498 -108.90753, on the route.

Bill Knight Gap (NMBDR)

Fence Lake: 34.653459 -108.677622, on the route.

Pie Town - Food: 34.298381 -108.134792, side trip.

side trip.

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El Morro National Monument: 35.038357 -108.348689, on the route.

Ice Cave and Bandera Volcano: 34.993242 -108.080516, side trip.

The Ice cave and Bandera Volcano are a privately owned attraction in the El Malpais National Monument. A fee is required to access the trails.

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Oso Ridge Lookout: 35.0383 -108.116616, side trip.

side trip.

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Grants - Food, Gas, Lodging: 35.150437 -107.849592, on the route.

Mount Taylor: 35.246569 -107.600611, side trip.

Its approximately a 700 ft elevation hike to the summit of Mt Taylor from the Water Canyon Trailhead.

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La Mosca Lookout: 35.251545 -107.596295, side trip.

side trip.

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Views of Cabezon Peak: 35.6355 -107.13224, on the route.

on the route.

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Cuba - Food, Gas, Lodging: 36.022144 -106.958601, on the route.

Teakettle Rock: 36.047472 -106.688781, on the route.

Abiquiu Reservoir: 36.252616 -106.430402, on the route.

Ghost Ranch: 36.313743 -106.481842, side trip.

Ghost Ranch is a 21,000-acre education and retreat center located near the small town of Abiquiu. Visitors enjoy hiking trails, museums, a café and gift shop, library, overnight accommodations and camping. Ghost Ranch is renowned for the landscapes made famous by painter Georgia O’Keeffe.

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Abiquiu - Food, Gas, Lodging: 36.207264 -106.318692, on the route.

El Rito - Food:M 36.343483 -106.189045, on the route.

Vallecitos: 36.494806 -106.117025, on the route.

Views of San Antonio Mountain: 36.851813 -106.098793, on the route.

Lagunitas Campground: 36.885675 -106.32021, side trip.

side trip.

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Colorado-New Mexico Border: 36.994137 -106.220745, on the route.

Colorado-New Mexico Border (NMBDR)

Antonito, CO: 37.079072 -106.008832, on the route.

NMBDR PACKING LIST

This packing list serves as an example and is not intended to be a complete list for your backcountry riding needs. Feel free to customize this list to work for you.

Gadgets
  • Map holder / map case
  • GPS unit
  • GPS mount
  • Compass
  • Cell phone
  • Phone charger
  • Plug adapter: auto to BMW plug
  • Camera
  • Spot II
  • Notebook
  • Pencil/pen
Clothing
  • Rain shell
  • Riding socks (2)
  • Zip pants/shorts
  • Short sleeve (base layer shirt)
  • Swim suit
  • Flip flops/sandals
  • Riding jersey / long-sleeve (base layer shirt)
  • Fleece jacket
  • Underwear
  • Wool beanie
  • Ball cap
  • Socks
Motorcycle
  • Engine oil
  • Clip-style master link
  • Fuses
  • Chain lube
  • Spare inner-tubes
Riding
  • Helmet
  • Boots
  • Goggles
  • Gloves (2 sets)
  • Protective gear (pressure suit, Leatt brace, knee braces)
  • Jacket
  • Pants
  • Balaclava or neck gaitor
  • Water bladder or bottle
  • Hydration pack
  • Ear plugs
Personal
  • Toiletries
  • Soap
  • Toothpaste
  • Toothbrush & Floss
  • Towel (MSR Pack Towel)
  • Razor
  • Toilet paper
  • Sunscreen
  • Bug spray
  • Pain reliever
  • Allergy meds
  • Wet Wipes
  • Sun Glasses
  • Passport if going into Canada
  • Money (credit cards & cash)
Camping Gear
  • Sleeping bag
  • Pillow
  • Roll pad
  • Tent
  • Dry bags (2) for tent, sleeping pad & sleeping bag
  • Water storage (Dromedary Bag)
  • Folding hand saw
  • Water filter
  • Eating utensils
  • Lighter / waterproof matches
  • Can opener
  • Pots & pans
  • Coffee brewing device
  • Coffee cup
  • Headlamp (2)
  • Kitchen set & spices
  • Stove
  • Stove fuel bottle
  • Folding camp chair
Books & Maps
Tools & Misc
  • Tool roll / tool set
  • Tire levers
  • Tire patch kit
  • Air pump
  • Tire gauge
  • Quicksteel
  • Leatherman tool
  • Swiss Army knife
  • Large inflation CO2 (for tubeless tires)
  • First Aid kit
  • Zip ties
  • Duct tape
  • Wire
  • LocTite
  • WD-40
  • Tow strap
Food
  • Energy bars
  • Coffee
  • Oatmeal
  • Other ingredients based on meal plan

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Below are answers to some Frequently Asked Questions about the New Mexico Backcountry Discovery Route.

What is the NMBDR?

The NMBDR is the sixth route developed by the Backcountry Discovery Routes organization for dual-sport and adventure motorcycle travel.  The NMBDR is a south-to-north route across the state of New Mexico covering over 1,200 miles of mostly non-paved track.

The route begins in the farming community of Dell City, Texas and finishes in Antonito, Colorado.  Traveling on the best backcountry roads, you will discover New Mexico’s scenic terrain including high-elevation forests, mountains, deserts and canyons. You will experience the unique culture and history of New Mexico’s rural towns, native reservations, historic locations & more.  The route also presents spectacular camping opportunities and highlights the state’s rich history.

Do I have to camp?

The NMBDR has fewer hotel opportunities than other Backcountry Discovery Routes. Camping on the other hand, is plentiful. Official campgrounds are shown on the front of the map with a small tent icon and many more primitive backcountry camps can be found along the way. Because of the limited beds available in the small towns along the NMBDR, it is recommended that riders make reservations ahead of their arrival. Rooms can be found in Cloudcroft, Ruidoso, Carizozo, Truth or Consequences, Reserve, Grants, Cuba, Abiquiu.

Where do I camp?

There are many campgrounds and suitable dry camping locations along the route. The Butler Motorcycle Map for the NMBDR has a tent icon showing campgrounds on the route and many near the route. The NMBDR Butler Map is available at www.touratech-usa.com,  www.butlermaps.com and other fine retailers.

How far between gas stops?

There are two sections where the distance is 153 miles. The first section is from Dell City to Weed.  Weed usually has gas but occasionally will be out. The second section is from Carrizozo to Truth or Consequences.  It too is 153 miles but you will find gas all the time in these two towns.  Carrying extra gas is strongly suggested.

Can I build a camp fire?

In most cases camp fires are allowed, but check with local Ranger Stations to determine if campfires are allowed before you build one. Forest fires are a threat during parts of the year and the rules that manage this risk must be followed. Be sure to fully extinguish fires so they are DEAD-OUT. Use water to ensure a fire is fully extinguished and the ground is left cool and wet.

Is there water on the route?

There are a few natural water sources along this route, however, depending on the snow pack, some may not be running. You can find potable water in the towns along the way.  It is suggested that plenty of water is carried for personal and cooking use. Here is a video on water filtration filmed in the Oregon Backcountry: http://youtu.be/vqOFZAoZdTU

Why do I need paper maps when I have GPS tracks?

Always bring a complete set of maps for the area you plan to ride. They have good information about roads, water sources, and are an indispensable resource when the GPS doesn’t work, or is giving questionable advice. Unplanned events can occur and having paper/synthetic maps of the area can be a life saver. National Forest maps are available at http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/map/state_list.shtml#U and local Ranger Stations. NMBDR Butler Motorcycle Maps are available at www.touratech-usa.com or www.butlermaps.com.

What GPS should I use?

Any GPS unit capable of displaying 15 track logs with a minimum of 500 points each is suitable for use on the NMBDR. Garmin models that work best for this application are: Zumo 665/660, Montana, GPSMap 60, 62, 76, 78 and 276. Other GPS manufacturers may have units that will work. Check the technical specs to determine suitability.

Where can I find the GPS tracks for the NMBDR?

The tracks for the route can be downloaded free of charge online at https://ridebdr.com/download-tracks/ .

What is the ideal bike to use?

Any bike that has a license plate, can run knobby tires, is set-up to carry the gear you plan to bring, and has the fuel range to make the distance between gas stops. Most adventure or dual-sport motorcycles will be suitable for the trip.  Choose the bike that you are the most comfortable riding in desert and mountain terrain.

How difficult is the route?

The NMBDR route is designed to be ridden on adventure and dual-sport motorcycles, as well as driven in 4×4 vehicles. There are no single-track style trails on this route. Many of the roads are in remote areas and reach high elevation areas where road maintenance is minimal or non-existent. You can expect to cover sections of road with deep ruts, loose rocks, sand and other challenges.  Road conditions change from week to week based on the recent weather.  When you see signs that read, “Roads maybe impassable when wet”, use caution, roads become very slick and can be impassable. You may also encounter sections that have trees or branches over the road. Depending on time of year and weather, there may be a few small deep water crossings. Flash floods are frequent during summer storms.  Don’t cross flooded washes. Wait until water subsides.

What time of year can I do the NMBDR?

The NMBDR is best in the months of June and September.  The route can be done in May, but snowpack in the high mountains may keep you from doing the entire route as mapped. New Mexico experiences summer monsoons in the months of July and August.  These heavy rains can keep you from riding the majority of the route due to mud and flash floods.  You can also ride the NMBDR far into November, but the days are shorter and you will encounter hunters.

What weather concerns should I have?

New Mexico has fast moving thunder storms during the summer months.  These storms usually build in the mountains in the early afternoon and usually contain lightning, hail stones and heavy downpours. These storms can contain heavy winds with blinding dust storms.

What tires should I use for the NMBDR?

DOT approved knobby tires (such as Continental TKC 80, Mefo Super Explorer, or Dunlop 606 are strongly recommended.

How long does it take to run the NMBDR?

Most people average 150 miles a day on a backcountry motorcycle trip. Plan on doing this route in 8 -10 days depending on how fast you want to travel and how early you want to roll out of camp. There is a lot of history to see on the NMBDR so planning a little extra time is suggested.

Are there any gates on the route?

Yes, there are several gates on the route. The route travels through several ranches where you will find gates open and closed.  Please leave the gates as you find them.

What is the highest elevation on the NMBDR?

The highest elevations are reached in section 7, where the Los Pinos River access reaches around 9500ft. The NMBDR never stays up high until you get within 100 miles south of the Colorado border.

How do I get information on current road conditions?

Visit http://www.backcountrydiscoveryroutes.com/NMBDR for latest route upates and links to message boards, and the BDR Facebook page, where you and other riders can post experiences, photos, and road condition reports.

Can the Route be done North to South?

Yes the route can be done North to South.

Is there cell phone coverage on the route?

Much of this route is remote and out of reach for cell phone towers. There will be long sections with no coverage. Your best bet is to talk or text in the towns or on top of mountains. You will be surprised where you get coverage and where you don’t. A satellite communication device is a good idea in the backcountry. Phones with Verizon service have more coverage on this route vs AT&T.

What about the Wild Animals?

New Mexico is a habitat to many large animals like the Black Bear, Elk, Wolves and Mountain Lions. Safe food practices while camping are an absolute for your safety and the animals safety.  Here is a link to find out more http://www.centerforwildlifeinformation.org/BeBearAware/Hiking_and_Camping/hiking_and_camping.html  Rattlesnakes are also found throughout the state.

Are BDR routes suitable for a 4x4 vehicle?

For the most part all of BDR routes are doable by 4×4’s with adequate tires and clearance. The roads are all public roads and do require a street legal vehicle.  One thing to keep in mind – the routes conditions can change dramatically due to rain and flash floods which cause the roads to become difficult or impassable.

The UTBDR probably will be the most challenging route in a 4×4 if you take the expert sections. Lockhart Basin is the hardest section of all the BDR’s.

Rating the Routes by Difficulty

We get a lot of requests to provide difficulty ratings. The difficulty of a route can change from day to day depending on weather, changes in the road conditions and road damage caused by a variety of forces including wind, storms, flooding, snow, logging, forest fires and more. The difficulty experienced by an individual also depends on their off-road skills, level of fitness, bike size and amount of weight carried on the bike. For these reasons we can’t provide a rating system like a ski resort. We can help you a bit by ranking the existing BDR’s from most difficult to least difficult. Here is the list: CA, AZ, UT, CO, WA, NM, ID, MA. So CABDR South is the most difficult especially if you ride the expert sections and Mid Atlantic BDR is the easiest in general terms. Although MABDR is the easiest there are still a few challenging rocky sections and the several water crossings that can get very difficult if the water is high. Also mud can be very challenging if it rains heavily. We hope this helps you in your planning. Be sure to also review the FAQ’s for each route prior to planning your trip.

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IN NO EVENT SHALL COMPANY, ITS DIRECTORS, EMPLOYEES OR AGENTS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, OR ANY OTHER DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF USE, LOSS OF PROFITS OR LOSS OF DATA, WHETHER IN AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, TORT (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO NEGLIGENCE) OR OTHERWISE, ARISING OUT OF OR IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE WEB SITES, THE SERVICES, THE CONTENT OR THE SITE MATERIALS CONTAINED IN OR ACCESSED THROUGH THE WEB SITES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY DAMAGES CASED BY OR RESULTING FROM RELIANCE BY USER ON ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED THROUGH THE WEB SITES OR THAT RESULT FROM MISTAKES, OMISSIONS, INTERRUPTIONS, DELETION OF FILES OR EMAIL, ERRORS, DEFECTS, VIRUSES, DELAYS IN OPERATION OR TRANSMISSION OR ANY FAILURE OF PERFORMANCE. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AGGREGATE LIABILITY OF COMPANY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, WARRANTY, TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE, WHETHER ACTIVE, PASSIVE OR IMPUTED), PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY OR OTHER THEORY, ARISING OUT OF OR RELATING TO THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE SITE EXCEED ANY COMPENSATION YOU PAY, IF ANY, TO COMPANY FOR ACCESS TO OR USE OF THE WEB SITES.

TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO EVENT WILL COMPANY OR ITS LICENSORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES OR LIABILITIES WHATSOEVER ARISING FROM OR RELATING TO THE DATA, THE SITE, OR SERVICE, WHETHER BASED ON CONTRACT, TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), STRICT LIABILITY OR OTHER THEORY, EVEN IF COMPANY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

THE GPS TRACKS ARE PROVIDED TO YOU FREE OF CHARGE. ACCORDINGLY, THEY ARE PROVIDED “AS IS,” WITH ALL FAULTS, DEFECTS AND ERRORS, AND WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, COMPANY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, ARISING BY LAW OR OTHERWISE, REGARDING THE APPLICATIONS, THE SITE AND THE SERVICE AND ITS PERFORMANCE OR SUITABILITY FOR YOUR INTENDED USE, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NONINFRINGEMENT. WITHOUT LIMITING THE FOREGOING, COMPANY DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE GPS TRACKS, THE SITE OR THE SERVICE WILL BE FREE OF BUGS, ERRORS, VIRUSES OR OTHER DEFECTS, AND COMPANY SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OF ANY KIND FOR THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE APPLICATIONS, THE SITE OR THE SERVICE OR ANY OTHER PRODUCT OR SERVICE ASSOCIATED THEREWITH.

Governing Law; Jurisdiction

These Terms of Service are governed by the laws of the State of Washington and the United States of America, without regard to any conflict of law principles to the contrary. You agree that any action at law or in equity arising out of or relating to the Site or the Service shall be filed only in the state and federal courts located in King County, Washington and you hereby irrevocably and unconditionally consent and submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of such courts over any suit, action or proceeding arising out of these Terms of Service.

YES, I AGREE
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