Southern California Backcountry Discovery Route

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The long awaited Southern-California BDR (CABDR-South) is the ninth route developed by the BDR organization for dual-sport and adventure motorcycle travel.

Take a spectacular, yet challenging 820-mile ride across the south-eastern region of California. Rugged two-track and remote dirt roads lead riders through majestic canyons, rocky riverbeds, and sandy washes of California’s famous deserts and national preserves, including a dream ride in the Mojave Preserve. This is the first Wintertime BDR

The Butler Motorcycle Map and the film dvd are now available for sale at Touratech-USA and Butler Motorcycle Maps.  The video-on-demand will be available on Janaury 10th on this page.

In the links on the right, you will also find an interactive map with section descriptions and the FAQ for the route.

Join us for the upcoming CABDR-South film premieres.  More dates are being added weekly, so check back on our website if you don’t see an event in your area.

The CABDR-South film is available for streaming or download.

Photos by Ely Woody.

Plan Your Adventure

Planning your adventure is half of the fun. We’ve gathered some useful information for this route in the below sections. Be sure to check out the lodging, food and fuel locations. You may find that there are more options than we have listed, but these are key places you may find useful. You may also find the packing lists, discovery points and FAQ’s helpful for developing your plan.

The Butler Motorcycle Map for this route is also a great tool to have in the planning and riding of the route. They can be purchased for a small fee at Butler Maps or Touratech-USA.

CABDR-SOUTH LODGING

Historic Mining Town of Julian, CA (CABDR-South)

South of Oceanside, head east to the historic mining town of Julian for a break off the bike and enjoy some of the best apple pie in the state.  A quaint Main St. and B&B’s if you need to spend the night.

Visit Website »

Wiley’s Well (CABDR-South)

Camping, but with no potable water.

Delights Hot Springs (CABDR-South)

Half way through this BDR and you may be ready for rustic lodging or a soak in a hot spring, particularly if you are riding in the middle of winter. Tecopa Brewing Company is just down the road too.

Visit Website »

The Inn at Benton Hot Springs (CABDR-South)

Reward your accomplishment for completing the CABDR-South with a stay at this Historic Bed and Breakfast.  Soak in the natural fed hot springs tubs, have a wonderful breakfast after a night spend in a bed rather than sand and rocks from the previous evenings.  Or, camp out behind the Inn. Even the campsites have their own private tubs. Reservations recommended.

Visit Website »

CABDR-SOUTH FOOD

Historic Mining Town of Julian, CA (CABDR-South)

South of Oceanside, head east to the historic mining town of Julian for a break off the bike and enjoy some of the best apple pie in the state.  A quaint Main St. and B&B’s if you need to spend the night.

Visit Website »

Aha Quin Resort or Water Wheel Resort (CABDR-South)

Aha Quin Resort or Water Wheel Resort ( 29630 US-95 just up the road from Aha Quin). Not much more there than mobile home parks situated on the banks of the Colorado River, but if you didn’t get supplies in Blythe, the general store is your last opportunity for a while.

Hi Sahara Oasis (CABDR-South)

Not so much of a desert Oasis as it is a place for food and fuel. Gas will probably be the most expensive on this route but grin, bare it, and be thankful you are not filling up a Winnebago, as there’s not another option.

The China Ranch (CABDR-South)

Date Shakes! You have earned it, don’t pass up chance to hydrate and carbo load before entering Death Valley. Dates are 75% Carbohydrates, 21% water and the perfect desert snack. Savoring all the varietals here will leave you feeling like King Tut.

Visit Website »

CABDR-SOUTH FUEL

Historic Mining Town of Julian, CA (CABDR-South)

South of Oceanside, head east to the historic mining town of Julian for a break off the bike and enjoy some of the best apple pie in the state.  A quaint Main St. and B&B’s if you need to spend the night.

Visit Website »

Hi Sahara Oasis (CABDR-South)

Not so much of a desert Oasis as it is a place for food and fuel. Gas will probably be the most expensive on this route but grin, bare it, and be thankful you are not filling up a Winnebago, as there’s not another option.

CABDR-SOUTH DISCOVERY POINTS

The Mission at San Juan Capistrano (CABDR-South)

Established 1776.  This is the gem of the California Missions, located less than a mile off the 5 Freeway, it offers a glimpse back in time to what was happening on the “Left Coast” at the same time our Nation was being founded.  If you can’t make it this trip, you will be back, just as the Swallows of lore.

Visit Website »

Historic Mining Town of Julian, CA (CABDR-South)

South of Oceanside, head east to the historic mining town of Julian for a break off the bike and enjoy some of the best apple pie in the state.  A quaint Main St. and B&B’s if you need to spend the night.

Visit Website »

Anza Borrego State Park (CABDR -South)

Ok, you could spend days riding amazing dirt roads or just stop here for a scenic overlook on your way, the Carrizo Badlands Overlook.

Visit Website »

Glamis, Imperial Dunes (CABDR-South)

So, you want to brush up on your sand skills before riding the CABDR, or make like Ricky Brabec or Andrew Short and get skills for the Dakar?  Well this is the place and it’s right on the way.

And check out what’s left of the “Wood Planked Road”, early road builders’ efforts to tame the drifting desert sand.

Visit Website »

Felicity, CA - Center of the World? (CABDR-South)

Could be, but then again since the world is a sphere, just about any place could warrant this claim. If you are into funky, interesting places, this is worth the time.

Visit Website »

Yuma Territorial Prison (CABDR-South)

Make the stop, even if it’s not 3:10.  You will be rewarded with a peek into the life of interesting desperados, living out their days in sweltering summer heat or freezing winter nights with nothing but steel bars to quell the elements.

Visit Website »

Ocean to Ocean Bridge (CABDR-South)

Finally! You are on the route and it begins with a jaunt over the one lane Ocean to Ocean Bridge that separates Yuma from Winterhaven, CA. and the start of the CABDR-South.

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Picacho State Park and the Colorado River (CABDR-South)

If you choose to camp after traveling south to Yuma, this historic state park is just up the road and well worth the fee to camp.

Visit Website »

The Bradshaw Trail (CABDR-South)

Created in 1862 this was the first trail that crossed the Riverside County desert all the way to the Colorado River to allow gold seekers to get to La Paz AZ.  There is camping (Wiley’s Well 33°29’36.8″N 114°53’20.8″W  or 33.49356 , -114.8891 ) just north of where we pick up the Trail heading east, but no potable water.

Visit Website »

The Blythe Intaglios (Geoglyphs) (CABDR-South)

Not to be missed.  Step back in time, way back in time. Experience Native American ground art believed to be over 800 years old and similar to the famed Nazca Lines found in Peru, although on a smaller scale.

Visit Website »

Aha Quin Resort or Water Wheel Resort (CABDR-South)

Aha Quin Resort or Water Wheel Resort ( 29630 US-95 just up the road from Aha Quin). Not much more there than mobile home parks situated on the banks of the Colorado River, but if you didn’t get supplies in Blythe, the general store is your last opportunity for a while.

The Mother Road or Historic Route 66 (CABDR-South)

Established on November 11, 1926, the highway, which became one of the most famous roads in the United States, originally ran from Chicago to Santa Monica covering a total of 2,448 miles. Get your kicks here;  oh wait, we all have electric starts now.

Hi Sahara Oasis (CABDR-South)

Not so much of a desert Oasis as it is a place for food and fuel. Gas will probably be the most expensive on this route but grin, bare it, and be thankful you are not filling up a Winnebago, as there’s not another option.

Goffs, The Mojave Desert Heritage Assoc. Museum and the Mojave Preserve (CABDR-South)

A lot here in the middle of nowhere.  If you have time check out the Museum before entering the Mojave Preserve.  You could spend a week just riding the Preserve alone, exploring everything from Afton Canyon to ZZYZX.   Now’s the time to extend the vacation, if you have cell coverage.

Visit Website »

Bert Smith’s Rock House (CABDR-South)

After WWI, returning veterans who had been exposed to poison gas found the deserts of California provided health benefits.  This cabin constructed in 1929 is an example of the homesteads build primarily of native materials.

Visit Website »

Remnants of the Original Mojave Road (CABDR-South)

A glance down and right will reward you with a view of the original wagon wheel tracks of the infamous Mojave Road.  This trail once connected Fort Mojave to Camp Cady and previously used by the Chumash as a trade route due to the existence of what little water is to be found in the Mojave.

Death Valley Mine (CABDR-South)

Death Valley Mine (though not in Death Valley) is an example of mines found throughout California.  Established in 1906 as a mine and a community for miners from surrounding claims.

Evening Star Mine (CABDR-South)

As the only tin ore mine in the Mojave, it was also one of the few with a crusher on top of the head frame.  As this mine ceased operation in 1944 it is still relatively well preserved.

Visit Website »

Riley’s Camp (CABDR-South)

A medic and an explosives trainer (kinda makes sense) during WWI, this camp is yet another example of a harsh life carved out of the Mojave Desert.  Be thankful you have heating, air conditioning and a flush toilet awaiting the return to your homestead.

Ivanpah Solar Thermal Electric Generating System (CABDR-South)

Producing an amazing 377 megawatts of energy, but not nearly the 1.21 gigawatts needed for your Flux Capacitor to get you back to the Future.   Oh well, plenty of history yet to be explored on the CABDR-South.

Visit Website »

Colosseum Mine (CABDR-South)

Everything you could ever want to know about this big hole in the ground, right here.  Ride down to the bottom at your own risk if you must, but resist the urge to take a dip in the multi-colored waters of the lake.  Word on the trail is that the residual chemicals left over from mining operations would leave your skin looking like something from the Apocalypse.

Visit Website »

The China Ranch (CABDR-South)

Date Shakes! You have earned it, don’t pass up chance to hydrate and carbo load before entering Death Valley. Dates are 75% Carbohydrates, 21% water and the perfect desert snack. Savoring all the varietals here will leave you feeling like King Tut.

Visit Website »

Delights Hot Springs (CABDR-South)

Half way through this BDR and you may be ready for rustic lodging or a soak in a hot spring, particularly if you are riding in the middle of winter. Tecopa Brewing Company is just down the road too.

Visit Website »

Harry Wade Exit, Saratoga Springs Road (CABDR-South)

Trying to find a quick way through Death Valley to the Gold of California almost proved disastrous for the wagon train guided by Harry.  Fortunately, he found a southern exit from Death Valley before they ran out of water. We use this route as our Southern Entrance to this place of storied heat and wonder.

Devils Golf Course (CABDR-South)

No, your GPS has not gone on the fritz.  You are now well below sea level. In fact, at 282 Feet below Sea level Badwater Basin (36°13’47.3″N 116°46’01.2″W or 36.22981, -116.767) is not just the lowest point in the US, but the 8th lowest elevation on earth.

Titus Canyon (CABDR-South)

This canyon offers up sweeping views, steep canyon walls, remnants of a boom town that lasted less than a year (Leadville) and represents classic Death Valley Adventure riding.

Scotty’s Castle (CABDR-South)

Damaged in a massive flashflood that roared through Death Valley in Oct. 2015 restoration is not yet complete, but when it is, it’s not to be missed.

Visit Website »

Ubehebe Crater (CABDR-South)

Your friends will think you had one too many when you tell of your visit to Ubehebe. Pronunciation aside, this massive crater is just one of the amazing things Death Valley offers on this route.

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The Race Track (CABDR-South)

An amazing set of atmospheric events combine to make rocks mysteriously slide across this desert playa leaving tracks etched in mud.   For decades this mystery went unsolved, many believing they were moved by the hand of God.

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Cerro Gordo (CABDR-South)

Here’s your chance to experience a living, breathing ghost and mining town.  Step inside the American Hotel, built in 1867, saunter up to the bar or sit at the poker table in the parlor where many a game ended in a gun fight (bullet holes still visible in the walls).

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Museum of Western Film History (CABDR-South)

If you are a fan of Western films, hitch your Adventure bike to a post out front and learn about the hundreds of films shot in and around Lone Pine California.  Make sure you pick up a map of the Alabama Hills with GPS coordinates to place yourself and your bike in your favorite film, from movies shot before sound, to recent blockbusters.

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Manzanar National Historic Site (CABDR-South)

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the establishment of camps like Manzanar to intern American citizens just by virtue of their ancestry. This affront to the liberty we all hold dear has been thoughtfully preserved to give each visitor insight into the lives of those interned and reminds us how our government, complicit with Americans overcome with unfounded fear, responded with barbed wire and armed guards.

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The Reward Mine (CABDR-South)

Not for you if you suffer Nyctophobia or Claustrophobia but the rest of us will enjoy the opportunity to ride our Adventure bikes deep into depths of a Gold and Silver mine. Just have a flashlight handy if you decide to experience total darkness by shutting off your bike and can’t find your ignition key.

Laws Railroad Museum (CABDR-South)

Just North of Bishop and right on the route is a Railroad Museum that resembles the Main Street of any western town we have envisioned since our youth.  Rekindle that youth with a stop here before continuing the last leg of the CABDR-South.

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Fish Slough Petroglyphs (CABDR-South)

Around 8,000 years ago this region was settled by the ancestors of the Bishop Paiute – Shoshone tribe. Over the course of thousands of years these earliest settlers left messages carved and painted on the three-quarter of a million-year-old volcanic rock across the region. Much of the messages carved in stone are unknown, however there is some consensus that they could be of celestial recordings or ceremonial in nature as opposed to many petroglyphs found in the West that record animals, hunters and tools of daily life.

The Inn at Benton Hot Springs (CABDR-South)

Reward your accomplishment for completing the CABDR-South with a stay at this Historic Bed and Breakfast.  Soak in the natural fed hot springs tubs, have a wonderful breakfast after a night spend in a bed rather than sand and rocks from the previous evenings.  Or, camp out behind the Inn. Even the campsites have their own private tubs. Reservations recommended.

Visit Website »

CABDR-SOUTH PACKING LIST

This packing list serves as an example and is not intended to be a complete list for your backcountry riding needs. Feel free to customize this list to work for you.

Riding
  • Helmet
  • Boots
  • Goggles
  • Gloves (2 sets)
  • Protective gear (pressure suit, Leatt brace, knee braces)
  • Jacket
  • Pants
  • Balaclava or neck gaitor
  • Water bladder or bottle
  • Hydration pack
  • Ear plugs
Gadgets
  • Map holder / map case
  • GPS unit
  • GPS mount
  • Compass
  • Cell phone
  • Phone charger
  • Plug adapter: auto to BMW plug
  • Camera
  • Spot II
  • Notebook
  • Pencil/pen
Clothing
  • Rain shell
  • Riding socks (2)
  • Zip pants/shorts
  • Short sleeve (base layer shirt)
  • Swim suit
  • Flip flops/sandals
  • Riding jersey / long-sleeve (base layer shirt)
  • Fleece jacket
  • Underwear
  • Wool beanie
  • Ball cap
  • Socks
Personal
  • Toiletries
  • Soap
  • Toothpaste
  • Toothbrush & Floss
  • Towel (MSR Pack Towel)
  • Razor
  • Toilet paper
  • Sunscreen
  • Bug spray
  • Pain reliever
  • Allergy meds
  • Wet Wipes
  • Sun Glasses
  • Passport if going into Canada
  • Money (credit cards & cash)
Motorcycle
  • Engine oil
  • Clip-style master link
  • Fuses
  • Chain lube
  • Spare inner-tubes
Camping Gear
  • Sleeping bag
  • Pillow
  • Roll pad
  • Tent
  • Dry bags (2) for tent, sleeping pad & sleeping bag
  • Water storage (Dromedary Bag)
  • Folding hand saw
  • Water filter
  • Eating utensils
  • Lighter / waterproof matches
  • Can opener
  • Pots & pans
  • Coffee brewing device
  • Coffee cup
  • Headlamp (2)
  • Kitchen set & spices
  • Stove
  • Stove fuel bottle
  • Folding camp chair
Books & Maps
Tools & Misc
  • Tool roll / tool set
  • Tire levers
  • Tire patch kit
  • Air pump
  • Tire gauge
  • Quicksteel
  • Leatherman tool
  • Swiss Army knife
  • Large inflation CO2 (for tubeless tires)
  • First Aid kit
  • Zip ties
  • Duct tape
  • Wire
  • LocTite
  • WD-40
  • Tow strap
Food
  • Energy bars
  • Coffee
  • Oatmeal
  • Other ingredients based on meal plan

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Below are answers to some of the Frequently Asked Questions about the Southern California Backcountry Discovery Route.

What is the CABDR?

The Southern-California BDR (CABDR-South) is the ninth route developed by the BDR organization for dual-sport and adventure motorcycle travel. This spectacular, yet challenging 820-mile ride across the south-eastern region of California consists of rugged two-track and remote dirt roads that lead riders through majestic canyons, rocky riverbeds, and sandy washes of California’s famous deserts and national preserves, including a dream ride in the Mojave Preserve. This is the first Wintertime BDR.

What time of year can I do the CABDR?

Most years you should be able to ride starting mid-October until mid-April.  This is a wintertime route, so winter storms may hamper some times and elevations may see some snow. You must check weather forecasts and check local conditions before heading out.

How difficult is the route?

The CABDR route is designed to be ridden on adventure and dual-sport motorcycles, as well as driven in 4×4 vehicles. There are no single-track style trails on this route. You can expect to cover sections of road with deep ruts, loose rocks, deep sand, rocky hill climbs/descents and other challenges.  Road conditions change from week to week based on the recent weather.  Depending on time of year and weather, there may be a few small deep water crossings. Flash floods can cause significant damage to roads.  Don’t cross flooded washes. Wait until water subsides. Overall, the CABDR-South is one of the harder BDR routes, and is suited for riders with intermediate and above off-road skills.

What weather concerns should I have?

The California region can have strong thunder storms during the springs months.  These storms can contain lightning and heavy downpours which can result in flash floods.  Fast moving snowstorms can also come up quick and leave you stranded, so always keep an eye to the sky.  You may also encounter high winds and sand storms on this route.

Can the Route be done North to South?

Yes the route can be done North to South. Lippicott Pass will be more of a challenge going North to South.

Do I need any permits or Passes?

You will need to have a National Parks Pass or purchase a pass when entering Death Valley.  There are kiosks at several of the entrances (but not on the route) so, purchase them in Furnace Creek at the Rangers Office. You do not need a pass for the Mojave Preserve.

Do I need a special permit for large groups?

The National Park system does require groups of 7 vehicles or more traveling together to obtain a permit.  Visit this site for more information – https://www.nps.gov/moja/planyourvisit/permitsandreservations.htm

How long does it take to run the CABDR?

Most people average 150 miles a day on a backcountry motorcycle trip. Plan on doing this route in 6-7 days depending on how fast you want to travel and how early you want to roll out of camp. There is a lot of history to see and places to visit on the CABDR so planning a little extra time is suggested.

How far between gas stops?

The longest section without gas is 150 miles, which doesn’t seem like much, but you never know when the next gas station will be closed or out of gas.  So carrying extra gas is strongly suggested. Never pass up the opportunity to get gas. This section has very little travel, so hoping someone will come by with gas might be just that… a wish.

Where do I camp?

There are  a few campgrounds along the route. The Butler Motorcycle Map for the CABDR has a tent icon showing campgrounds on the route and many near the route.  There is dispersed camping along the way. Visit the National Parks websites to find out about camping in the Mojave National Preserve and Death Valley. https://www.nps.gov/moja/planyourvisit/camping.htm , https://www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/camping.htm.

Camping is available in:

Yuma, AZ
Blythe
Off Route: Needles
Primm, NV
Tecopa
Shoshone
Furnace Creek
Lone Pine
Big Pine
Bishop
Benton Hot Springs

Can I build a camp fire?

In most cases camp fires are allowed, but check with local Ranger Stations to determine if campfires are allowed before you build one. In most cases, campfires are only allowed in fire rings. Be sure to fully extinguish fires so they are DEAD-OUT. Use water to ensure a fire is fully extinguished and the ground is left cool and wet.

Do I have to camp?

The answer is no. The CABDR has some motel opportunities on the route and if you travel off route you will fine more motels in the bigger cities . If you do decide to camp, you will find official campgrounds on the front of this map with a small tent icon and some primitive backcountry camps can be found along the way. Because of the limited beds available in the small towns along the CABDR, it is recommended that riders make reservations ahead of their arrival.

Is there water on the route?

DANGER -There really no water sources along the route other than, you can find potable water in the towns along the way.  It is suggested you carry twice as much water as you think you need. You can get extremely sick or die in the desert without water.  Here is a video on water filtration filmed in the Backcountry: http://youtu.be/vqOFZAoZdTU

Why do I need paper maps when I have GPS tracks?

Always bring a complete set of maps for the area you plan to ride. They have good information about roads, water sources, and are an indispensable resource when the GPS doesn’t work, or is giving questionable advice. Unplanned events can occur and having paper/synthetic maps of the area can be a life saver. National Forest maps are available at http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/map/state_list.shtml#U and local Ranger Stations. CABDR Butler Motorcycle Maps are available at www.touratech-usa.com or www.butlermaps.com.

Where can I find the GPS tracks for the CABDR?

The tracks for the route can be downloaded free of charge online at https://ridebdr.com/download-tracks/.

What GPS should I use?

Any GPS unit capable of handling 15 track logs with a minimum of 1500 points each is suitable for use on the CABDR. Garmin models that work best for this application are: Zumo 590/595/395/396, Montana, and 276Cx. Many other GPS units are compatible with the GPX file format, check the owner’s manual of your device for more information.

What is the ideal bike to use?

Any bike that has a license plate, can run knobby tires, is set-up to carry the gear you plan to bring, and has the fuel range to make the distance between gas stops. Most adventure or dual-sport motorcycles will be suitable for the trip.  Choose the bike that you are the most comfortable riding off-road.

What tires should I use for the CABDR?

DOT approved knobby tires are strongly recommended.

Can you do the route two-up?

Segments of this route can be ridden two-up if you are skilled in riding off-road two-up. But we do not recommend it be ridden two up.

Are there any gates on the route?

There are a few gates along the route. Please leave the gate as you find it.

How do I get information on current road conditions?

We try to post the most up-to-date information about the route on this page.  We find out about route and road conditions from the community, so if you encounter any road closures or severe conditions that are worth reporting, please contact us with the information.

Also to find out information about Death Valley Road closures visit this link https://www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/conditions.htm

Is there cell phone coverage on the route?

Much of this route is remote and out of reach for cell phone towers. There will be long sections with no coverage. Your best bet is to talk or text in the towns or on top of mountains. You will be surprised where you get coverage and where you don’t. A satellite communication device is a good idea in the backcountry.

What about the Wild Animals?

The CABDR is a habitat to Deer, Mountain Lions, Badgers and Coyotes. Safe food practices while camping are an absolute for your safety and the animals safety. Rattlesnakes are also found throughout the route.

Can I drive a 4x4 on this route?

Yes the entire route is passable with a SUV or 4×4.  There are some difficult rock climbs and clearance issues for vehicles.  Deep sand can be expected, so adequate tires and ground clearance are recommended.  Off-road skills and training is highly recommended.  Caution should always be used when driving or riding off-road.

4×4 vehicles should be able to go through most of the route, but we recommend to stay off of Lippincott Pass. That is a rough, tight, rocky, steep road. Also, we do not recommend going up the back side to Cerro Gordo.

Rating the Routes by Difficulty

We get a lot of requests to provide difficulty ratings. The difficulty of a route can change from day to day depending on weather, changes in the road conditions and road damage caused by a variety of forces including wind, storms, flooding, snow, logging, forest fires and more. The difficulty experienced by an individual also depends on their off-road skills, level of fitness, bike size and amount of weight carried on the bike. For these reasons we can’t provide a rating system like a ski resort. We can help you a bit by ranking the existing BDR’s from most difficult to least difficult. Here is the list: CA, AZ, UT, CO, WA, NM, ID, MA. So CABDR South is the most difficult especially if you ride the expert sections and Mid Atlantic BDR is the easiest in general terms. Although MABDR is the easiest there are still a few challenging rocky sections and the several water crossings that can get very difficult if the water is high. Also mud can be very challenging if it rains heavily. We hope this helps you in your planning. Be sure to also review the FAQ’s for each route prior to planning your trip.

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THE GPS TRACKS ARE PROVIDED TO YOU FREE OF CHARGE. ACCORDINGLY, THEY ARE PROVIDED “AS IS,” WITH ALL FAULTS, DEFECTS AND ERRORS, AND WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, COMPANY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, ARISING BY LAW OR OTHERWISE, REGARDING THE APPLICATIONS, THE SITE AND THE SERVICE AND ITS PERFORMANCE OR SUITABILITY FOR YOUR INTENDED USE, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NONINFRINGEMENT. WITHOUT LIMITING THE FOREGOING, COMPANY DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE GPS TRACKS, THE SITE OR THE SERVICE WILL BE FREE OF BUGS, ERRORS, VIRUSES OR OTHER DEFECTS, AND COMPANY SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OF ANY KIND FOR THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE APPLICATIONS, THE SITE OR THE SERVICE OR ANY OTHER PRODUCT OR SERVICE ASSOCIATED THEREWITH.

Governing Law; Jurisdiction

These Terms of Service are governed by the laws of the State of Washington and the United States of America, without regard to any conflict of law principles to the contrary. You agree that any action at law or in equity arising out of or relating to the Site or the Service shall be filed only in the state and federal courts located in King County, Washington and you hereby irrevocably and unconditionally consent and submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of such courts over any suit, action or proceeding arising out of these Terms of Service.

YES, I AGREE
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